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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
or in the real world. >> reporter: the need is exploding. the pentagon's u.s. cyber command is drawing up plans to bring 4,000 new computer security experts onboard. homeland security secretary janet napolitano warns that the lack of experts nationwide is critical. >> it should be encrypted here and is not. >> reporter: the university of southern california is among a handful of the nation's colleges answering the call, preparing to offer a degree in cyber security. >> for whatever type of system that i'm going to develop for somebody i want to make sure that it's secure. >> in the past if your computer got attacked, maybe you were worried about slow start up speeds. now they can actually affect your livelihood. >> reporter: educators say it's essential to start building the cyber work force earlier in schools and colleges, preparing for one part of the economy everyone agrees is expanding as the cyber threat spreads. pete williams, nbc news, washington. >>> the man who has been on the forefront of fighting cyber attacks among other threats at the pentagon is weighing in on the grilling his lik
valor. our report tonight from our pentagon correspondent, jim miklaszewski. >> reporter: wedged deep into a valley surrounded by soaring mountains, combat outpost keating in eastern afghanistan was a death trap. for staff sergeant clint romesha, it was indefensible. >> every which direction you looked, you were looking straight up at the mountain. >> reporter: romesha and the other soldiers at c.o.p. keating were under constant attack. but in october 2009, the taliban launched the most ferocious assault ever. and unleashed a deadly downpour of fire like shooting fish in a barrel. >> 360 degrees, we were taking, you know, rpgs, machine gunfire, mortar fire was coming in. i mean, it was accurate. it was, you know, on target. it was pinning positions down. >> reporter: the americans were vastly outnumbered, nearly 400 to 52. in the first hour, three u.s. soldiers were killed. others pinned down by gunfire. and with no regard for his own life, romesha led five others on a rescue mission. >> it was going to be a knife fight, getting to where we were going. >> reporter: romesha took out an
and do the hard work of governing. >> reporter: the massive cuts to the pentagon, including a 20% pay cut for more than 700,000 civilian workers john mccain called unconscionable, demanding mr. obama lead. >> the president should be calling us over somewhere, camp david, the white house, somewhere and us sitting down and trying to avert these cuts. >> reporter: but even within the republican party, many are questioning how bad the cuts will be, accusing you the president of exaggerating the consequences. >> to not cut 2.5% out of the total budget over a year when it's twice the size it was ten years ago, give me a break. >> reporter: still, at this ship yard in norfolk, virginia, 1600 letters warning of possible pink slips are already in the mail, while workers wait for washington to act. >> guys really need to put their heads together and figure something out. >> you know, they take this away, a lot of people are going to be hurt. >> reporter: a looming crisis underxbird virginia's republican governor. >> sequester was put in place to be a hammer, not a policy. now here we are a week awa
, half from the pentagon, half from nondefense programs. everything from education to national parks to meals on wheels. exempt from the cuts, programs like social security and veterans' benefits and student loans. the administration warns federal food inspectors would be temporarily furloughed. that could mean less product, higher prices and fewer jobs. air travelers may see longer lines at security checkpoints. by one congressional estimate, as many as 9,000 tsa officers may have to be laid off. the pentagon budget would be cut 11% a year, even as the war in afghanistan continues. d.o.d. civilian workers will likely take the hit. plans call for more than 700,000 to take one day off a week without pay, a 20% pay cut. jason mckenzie owns ride on bikes in columbus, georgia, home to fort benning. military employees make up half his business so smaller paychecks could mean fewer sales. >> it's going to take money out of everybody's pocket, everything will crash. everybody will stop spending, everybody. >> reporter: one of the ripple effects of gridlock in washington felt far beyond the
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)